Teaching Fellowship

Perhaps even more than would have been the case during a typical semester, this lectureship enabled me to experiment and grow as an instructor. I improved the structure and delivery of my (recorded and in-person) lectures, tested a variety of formats for leading effective discussions, learned the basics of online teaching, and—above all—accepted the importance of flexibility in the face of students’ needs and changing teaching environments.

Kayci Olson Harris (2020)

George L. Mosse Teaching Fellowship in European History

Former students of George L. Mosse who wish to honor their teacher in a way that acknowledged his commitment to teaching, and his extraordinary ability to inspire his students established the George L. Mosse Teaching Fellowship in 1992. Contributions to the teaching fellowship fund by former students, other alumni, colleagues, and friends underwrite a one-year teaching fellowship every other year. The Teaching Fellowship allows an advanced PhD student under the supervision of their doctoral advisor to develop and teach an undergraduate course. The Mosse Teaching Fellow is considered a part of the Department of History faculty and has full responsibility for teaching an undergraduate class. The Mosse Teaching Fellow creates the syllabus, selects the textbooks, has an office, maintains office hours, and is listed as the instructor of record in the timetable. The Fellowship provides funding for a full academic year. The Graduate Fellowship Committee of the Department of History selects Mosse Teaching Fellows, with consideration given to the applicant’s academic record and prior performance as a teaching assistant.

Outstanding graduate students are inspiring teachers as they are still in the process of learning and sharing knowledge.

Recent course posters:

2018 - Abby Lewis Mosse Course

Teaching Fellowship Course Titles and Syllabi:

2019-2020
Kayci Olson Harris
Course: The Cold War in European Culture

2017-2018
Abigail Lewis
Course: Picturing History: Visual Culture, Photography, and Memory in Modern Europe

2017-2018
John Boonstra
Course: Modern Mediterranean History, 1798 to the Present

2015-2016
Grace Allen
Course: From Food to Fashion: Creating Consumer Desire in Modern Europe

2014-2015
Lane Sunwall
Course: European Imperialism: Expansion and Contraction? — 1870-Present

2013-2014
Katie Jarvis
Course: From Humors to Hysteria: Human and Political Bodies in European History, 1517-1918

2013-2014
Terry Peterson
Course: Europeans and Muslims in the Modern Mediterranean, 1800-Present

2012-2013
Eric O’Connor
Course: The Historical Development of European Unity, 1945-Present

2011-2012
James Coons
Course: Rebels, Revolutionaries, and Cultural Change in Europe, 1300-1800

2011-2012
Jessica Kirstein
Course: Modern Jewish History in Latin America

2010-2011
Jeffrey Hobbs
Course: The History of Democracy in Europe, 1789-2000

2010-2011
James Matenaer
Course: The Developing Institutions of Medieval Education, 300-1500

2008-2009
Holly Grout
Course: European Consumer Society, 1700-Present

2008-2009
Ethan Katz
Course: Jews and Muslims in the Mediterranean: 1800-Present

2008-2009
Eric Platt
Course: The Netherlands in the Age of Rembrandt and Vermeer

2008-2009
Gregory Shealy
Course: Germany in the Long 19th Century

2007-2008
Hunter Martin
Course: French Intellectuals in the 20th Century: Ideology and Identity

2007-2008
William Meier
Course: The European Underworld, 1800-2000: A Social and Cultural History

2006-2007
Sharon Elise (Lisa) Cline
Course: Nationalism and Sexuality in 19th and 20th Century Europe

2005-2006
Denise Kawasaki
Course: Medieval Thought from St. Augustine to Fifteenth Century Conciliarism

2005-2006
Robert Lewis
Course: The European City and the Transformation of Visual Culture, 1850-Present

2004-2005
Scott Moranda
Course: Society and Environment: An Environmental History of the European World

2004-2005
Gil Ribak
Course: Jewish – Gentile Relations in Urban America, 1830-1970

2004-2005
Ana Schaposchnik
Course: Society and Environment: An Environmental History of the European World

2004-2005
Eric Zuelow
Course: The History of Modern Travel

2003-2004
Eric Ehrenreich
Course: History of European Racism

2003-2004
Catherine Plum
Course: East German Society & Culture, 1949-1989

2002-2003
Robert Zens
Course: From Empire to Nation-State: History of the Balkans

2002-2003
Eric Carlsson
Course: Religion and the European Enlightenment, 1650-1800

2001-2002
Alison Schulz
Course: Revolutionary Britain: Civil War and Commonwealth

2001-2002
Erik Jensen
Course: Weimar Germany: Society, Politics and Modernity in Europe’s ‘Roaring Twenties’

1999-2000
Daniel Kowalsky
Course: Revolution and Civil War in Twentieth-Century Europe

1997-1998
Susan Boettcher
Course: The City & Urban Life in Early Modern Europe

1995-1996
Susan Dinan
Course: Women in Europe 1500-1830