Mosse Graduate Program Fellowships

The George L. Mosse Fellowship in LGBTQ+ History has helped me make a significant contribution on the history of Germany and the history of sexuality.

Javier Samper Vendrell, University of Pennsylvania

Mosse Graduate Fellowship in LGBTQ+ History

This fellowship is intended to attract and support outstanding Ph.D. candidates who wish to study some aspect of LGBTQ+ history in any area of the world. The fellowship package, available only to incoming students, consists of five years of guaranteed support.

To apply: Submit an application to the UW-Madison Department of History, specifying your wish to be considered for the Mosse Fellowship in LGBTQ+ History on the Supplemental Application form found on the History Department’s Graduate Admission webpage.

For more information, visit the UW-Madison History Department fellowships page or contact Leslie Abadie, abadie@wisc.edu, (608) 263-1962.

Fellows in LGBTQ+ History will benefit from the Program in Gender and Women’s History (PGWH) and History Department faculty in the Women, Gender, and Sexuality cluster, including:

Ashley Brown
Suzanne Desan
A. Finn Enke
April Haynes
Judith A. Houck
Mary Lou Roberts
Gloria Whiting

Application Deadline is December 1

Previous Mosse LGBTQ+ Fellows:

2020 Isobel Bloom, “‘Why are you supporting the destruction of our race in the name of choice?’: Black women, racial justice, and the pro-life movement in the late-twentieth-century United States” (MA)

2018 Ezra Gerard, “Dissonant Desires: Class and the Construction of Male Homosexuality in Fin-de-Siecle Sexology” (MA)

2015 Dan Guadagnolo, “Segmenting America: Consumer Marketing from Mass to Niche after 1945” (PhD)

2014 Simon D. Elin Fisher, “Queer Intimacies, Nonviolence, and the Making of the Civil Rights Movement” (PhD)

2010 Javier Samper Vendrell, “Danger at the Newstand: Homosexuality, Youth, and Mass Culture in the Weimar Republic” (PhD)

2009 Christopher Hommerding, “The Pixies of Pendarvis: History, Performance, and Queerness in Twentieth-Century Small-Town Wisconsin” (PhD)

2008 Ashley Barnes-Gilbert, “River Town Brothel Culture: Sex Worker Mobility, Policing, and Agency, 1870-1940” (PhD)

2008 Stephanie Westcott, “Producing Panic: Media, Morality, and American Sexuality, 1945-1970” (PhD)

Mosse WDGF Fellowship in Modern European Cultural History & Modern Jewish History

This fellowship is intended to attract and support outstanding Ph.D. candidates who wish to study some aspect of Modern European or Modern Jewish history in any area of the world. The fellowship package, available only to incoming students, consists of five years of guaranteed support.

To apply: Submit an application to the UW-Madison Department of History, specifying your wish to be considered for the Mosse Fellowship in Modern European Cultural History or Modern Jewish History on the Supplemental Application form found on the History Department’s Graduate Admission webpage.

For more information, visit the UW-Madison History Department fellowships page or contact Leslie Abadie, abadie@wisc.edu, (608) 263-1962.

Fellows in Modern Jewish History can take advantage of the thirty-five faculty from seventeen disciplines associated with the George L. Mosse/Laurence A. Weinstein Center for Jewish Studies, an interdisciplinary program.

For additional information on the Mosse WDGF Fellowships, please contact:

Tony Michels, George L. Mosse Professor of American Jewish History and Jewish Studies, aemichels@wisc.edu.
Skye Doney, Director George L. Mosse Program, doney@wisc.edu.

Application Deadline is December 1

Previous Mosse Modern European Cultural History & Modern Jewish History Fellows:

2022 August Brereton

2021 Rima Turner, “Confronting the Jewish Rejection of Jewish Particularism: Chaim Zhitlowsky’s Pedagogical Intervention into Ashkenazi American Assimilation” (MA)

2021 Nina Walter, “Between Nations and Empires: Esperanto in Poland, 1887-1939” (MA)

2020 Ludwig Decke

2019 Ethell Gershengorin, “Objects of the Home and Spaces of Hygiene: The Ambiguity of Women in Soviet Antireligious Campaigns, 1926-1933” (MA)

2018 Svea Larson, “The America Hat: Fashion in Swedish American Immigrant Exchanges, 1880-1940” (MA)

2017 Joseph Banin, “The ‘Nation’s’ Response to the Crisis of European Jewry, 1933-1945” (MA)

2016 Conrad Allen, “No Calvaryman’s War? Horsemen, Manhood, and Modernity in Britain 1914-1939” (MA)

2016 Chad S.A. Gibbs, “Against that Darkness: Perseverance, Resistance, and Revolt at Treblinka” (PhD)

2016 Alice C.M. Kwok, “Sexing the Terror: The Jeunesse Doree and the Fall of the Parisian Jacobin Club (1794)” (MA)

2015 Valeria Navarro Rosenblatt, “Jewish Communists in Chile: Experience and Memory in the Life Stories of Dora Guralnik and Carlos Berger, 1930-1990” (PhD)

2015 Britt Tevis, “May It Displease the Court: Jewish Lawyers and the Democratization of American Law” (PhD)

2013 Laila Laurel Miller, “Phryne Disrobed, Lais Bejewelled and Aspasia Draped in Muslin: The Development of a French Hetaira Tradition in the Long Eighteenth Century” (MA)

2012 Abigail Lewis, “Double Exposure: French Photography and Everyday Choices from Nazi Occupation to Liberation, 1940-1950” (PhD)

2011 Michelle Gaseor

2010 Yuan Chang, “Xiong Shili, Qian Mu and Modern Chinese Conservatism” (PhD)

2008 Charles Cahill, “Rescuing the Individual: The Kierkegaard Renaissance in Weimar Germany” (PhD)

2008 Terrence Peterson, “Counterinsurgent Bodies: Social Welfare and Psychological Warfare in French Algeria, 1956-1962” (PhD)

2008 Haley Cooper, “They Framed Hypotheses: Body and Belief in the Early Boyle Lectures” (MA)

2007 Jessica Kirstein, “Making Their Place: Jews, Immigrants, and the Politics of Alternative Workers’ Citizenship in Argentina, 1900-1922” (PhD)

2007 Katherine Guenoun, “Between Synagogue and Society: Jewish Women in Nineteenth-Century France” (PhD)

2004 Sarah Robinson, “Prefects on the Scene: Sociability, Politics, and State Building in Napoleonic France” (MA)

2004 Nadine Zimmerli, “The Rendezvous of All Nations: Cosmopolitan Encounters in the German City of Dresden Before World War I” (PhD)

2003 Sonja Mekel, “‘Herren from the Tribe of Juda’: The Relationship between German and German-Jewish Immigrants in Milwaukee and Chicago, 1840-1900” (PhD)

2003 Mary Wunnenberg Kirsh, “The Lost Children of Europe: Narratives of the Rehabilitation of Child Holocaust Survivors in Great Britain and Israel” (PhD)

2002 Ethan Katz, “Jews and Muslims in the Shadow of Marianne: Conflicting Identities and Republican Culture in France (1914-1975)” (PhD)

2002 Gil Ribak, “What the American Can Do in His Anger’: The Images of Gentiles Among Jewish Immigrants in New York City, 1890-1920” (PhD)

2002 Sarah Wobick-Segev, “Make Yourself at Home: Jewish Belonging and Sociability in Berlin, Paris and St. Petersburg, 1890-1950s” (PhD)

2001 Ana Schaposchnik, “Under the Eyes of the Inquisition. Crypto-Jews in the Ibero-American World (Peru, 1600s)” (PhD)

2001 Eric Ehrenreich, “Genealogy and Genocide: The Nazi ‘Ancestral Proof’ and the Holocaust” (PhD)

2002 Robert Lewis, “The Society of the Stadium: Urban Modernity, Sports Spectatorship and Mass Politics in France, 1893-1975” (PhD)