Berlin 2019 Participants

Biographical statements:


Adi Armon

Adi Armon is Visiting Assistant Professor with the George L. Mosse Program in History.Adi Armon is a Visiting Assistant Professor with the George L. Mosse Program in History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His forthcoming book, Leo Strauss between Weimar and America, will be published with Palgrave Macmillan in 2019.

 
 
 

Steven Aschheim

Steven Aschheim, Emeritus Professor of History at the Hebrew University, JerusalemSteven E. Aschheim is Emeritus Professor of History at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem where he taught Cultural and Intellectual History in the Department of History since 1982 and held the Vigevani Chair of European Studies. He also acted as the Director of the Franz Rosenzweig Research Centre for German Literature and Cultural History. Apart from academic journals, he has written for the Times Literary Supplement, the New York Times, the Jewish Review of Books and Ha’aretz. He has spent sabbaticals at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, the Institute of Advanced Study at Princeton and in 2002-3 was the first Mosse Exchange Professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. During September-October 2005 he taught at Columbia University as the Max Kade Distinguished Visiting Scholar of German Studies. He has also taught at the University of Maryland, Reed College, the Free University in Berlin and the Central European University in Budapest. He taught at the University of Toronto in October 2008 and at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor from September-December 2009. He served as a Research Fellow at the Hamburg Institute for Social Research in the summer of 2010 and in March-April 2011 was the Stan Gold Visiting Professor of Jewish History at Trinity College, Dublin. In 2013-2014 he was a Fellow of the Straus Institute for the Advanced Study of Law & Justice at New York University School of Law. In April 2016 he was a Fellow at the Dubnow Institute, Leipzig and in November 2016 was a Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies at the University of Warwick. In 2017 (September-October), he held the first Menasseh Ben Israel Institute Chair in Jewish Studies at the University of Amsterdam, and also taught at the University of Antwerp. He is married, has three children – and three grand-daughters and two grandsons! He is the author of Brothers and Strangers: The East European Jew in German and German-Jewish Consciousness, 1800-1923 (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1982); The Nietzsche Legacy in Germany, 1890-1990 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992) which has been translated into German and Hebrew; Culture and Catastrophe: German and Jewish Confrontations with National Socialism and Other Crises (New York: New York University Press, 1996); In Times of Crisis: Essays on European Culture, Germans and Jews (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2001); Scholem, Arendt, Klemperer: Intimate Chronicles in Turbulent Times (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2001), which has also appeared in Italian, and Beyond the Border: The German-Jewish Legacy Abroad (Princeton University Press, 2007). He is the editor of the conference volume, Hannah Arendt in Jerusalem (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2001), also translated into Hebrew. His At the Edges of Liberalism: Junctions of European, German and Jewish History (Palgrave Macmillan) appeared in June 2012. A volume, co-edited with Vivian Liska, entitled The German-Jewish Experience Revisited (Berlin, De Gruyter) appeared in 2015. His volume entitled Fragile Spaces: Forays into Jewish Memory, European History and Complex Identities appeared in 2018.

Ofer Ashkenazi

Ofer Ashkenazi is an Associate Professor in History and the Director of the Richard Koebner-Minerva Center for German History at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Ofer Ashkenazi is an Associate Professor in History and the Director of the Richard Koebner-Minerva Center for German History at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

 

 

 

Aleida Assmann

Aleida AssmannAleida Assmann studied English Literature and Egyptology at the universities Heidelberg and Tübingen. From 1993 – 2014 she held the chair of English Literature and Literary Theory at the University of Konstanz, Germany. She taught as a guest professor at various universities (Rice University, Princeton, Yale, Chicago and Vienna). The Max Planck Research Award allowed her to establish a research group on memory and history (2009-2015). Together with her husband Jan Assmann she received the peace Price of the German Book Trade. Her main areas of research are historical anthropology, history of media, history and theory of reading and writing, cultural memory, with special emphasis on Holocaust and trauma. Recent Publications in English: Memory in a Global Age. Discourses, Practices and Trajectories (ed. with Sebastian Conrad, 2010), Cultural Memory and Western Civilization: Functions, Media, Archives (2012), Memory and Political Change (ed. with Linda Shortt, 2012), Introduction to Cultural Studies: Topics, Concepts, Issues (2012). Shadows of Trauma. Memory and the Politics of Postwar Identity (2016).

Doris L. Bergen

Doris Bergen
Photo courtesy of Michael Rajzman.

Doris L. Bergen is the Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Professor of Holocaust Studies. Her research focuses on issues of religion, gender, and ethnicity in the Holocaust and World War II and comparatively in other cases of extreme violence. Her books include Twisted Cross: The German Christian Movement in the Third Reich (1996); War and Genocide: A Concise History of the Holocaust (2003); The Sword of the Lord: Military Chaplains from the First to the Twenty-First Centuries (edited, 2004); and Lessons and Legacies VIII (edited, 2008).

 

 

 

Darcy Buerkle

Darcy BuerkleDarcy Buerkle is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of History at Smith College, where she is also an affiliate faculty member in the Program for the Study of Women and Gender. She is the author of numerous essays on Jewish visual and cinematic cultures and the history of emotion, including most recently on the work of director Fred Zinnemann; her book, Nothing Happened: Charlotte Salomon and an Archive of Suicide, was published in 2014 by the University of Michigan Press. Professor Buerkle’s current project concerns neglected and gendered imaginaries of democracy in early post-WWII Germany and, in particular, a rethinking of a well-established and gendered history of guilt and complicity after 1945.

 

 

Skye Doney

Skye Doney is Director of the George L. Mosse Program in History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Skye Doney is the Director of the George L. Mosse Program in History. He translated, edited, and annotated Eva Noack-Mosse’s Holocaust memoir, Last Days of Theresienstadt (Madison, 2018). His articles have appeared most recently in The Catholic Historical Review and Environment, Space, Place. Currently he is completing a manuscript on German Catholic religious practices between the 1830s and 1930s.

 

Arie M. Dubnov

Arie M. Dubnov is an associate professor of history and the Max Ticktin Chair of Israel Studies at the George Washington University.

Arie M. Dubnov is an associate professor of history and the Max Ticktin Chair of Israel Studies at the George Washington University. Among his publications are the intellectual biography Isaiah Berlin: The Journey of a Jewish Liberal (2012), and two edited volumes, Zionism – A View from the Outside (2010 [in Hebrew]), seeking to put Zionist history in a larger comparative trajectory, and Partitions: A Transnational History of Twentieth-century Territorial Separatism (2019, co-edited with Laura Robson), tracing the genealogy of the idea of partition in the British interwar Imperial context and reconstructing the links connecting partition plans in Ireland, Palestine/Israel and India/Pakistan. In addition, he published numerous essays in leading venues including Nations & Nationalism, Modern Intellectual History, Theoria u’vikoret [Theory & Criticism], Rethinking History, Jewish Social Studies, The Journal of Israeli History and more. His current book research project, tentatively entitled Dreamers of the Third Empire/Temple, examines ties between Zionist and British imperial thinkers in interwar years and seeks to uncover alternative, neglected federalist political schemes for the future of the region that were circulating at the time.


Stefanos Geroulanos

Stefanos Geroulanos is a Professor of History at New York University.

Stefanos Geroulanos is a Professor of History at New York University. He is the author, most recently, of The Human Body in the Age of Catastrophe: Brittleness, Integration, Science, and the Great War (2018, with Todd Meyers) and Transparency in Postwar France (2017), and the co-editor of The Scaffolding of Sovereignty: Global and Aesthetic Perspectives on the History of a Concept (2017, with Zvi Ben-Dor and Nicole Jerr).

 

Adi Gordon

Adi Gordon is assistant professor of history at Amherst College.

Adi Gordon is assistant professor of history at Amherst College. He is the author of Toward Nationalism’s End: An Intellectual Biography of Hans Kohn (2017) and “In Palestine. In a Foreign Land”: The Orient. A German-Language Weekly Between German Exile and Aliyah (2004) and the editor of Brith Shalom and Bi-National Zionism: “The Arab Question” as a Jewish Question (2008). His current research analyzes the conservative revolutionary movement in Weimar Germany.

 

Udi Greenberg

Udi Greenberg is an associate professor of European history at Dartmouth College.

Udi Greenberg is an associate professor of European history at Dartmouth College. He is the author of the award-winning The Weimar Century: German Émigrés and the Ideological Foundations of the Cold War (Princeton, 2015), and is currently working on a second-book project that explores the transformation of Catholic-Protestant relations, from animosity to peace, from the 1890s to the 1970s. His articles appeared in the American Historical Review, Journal of Modern History, and the Journal of History of Ideas, among others, and he has also published several essays on politics, religion, and history in The Nation, Dissent, n+1 and elsewhere.

Raphael Gross

Raphael Gross, President of the Foundation Deutsches Historisches Museum.

Raphael Gross is currently President of the Foundation Deutsches Historisches Museum. Previously he was the director of the Simon Dubnow Institute for Jewish History and Culture and holder of the chair for Jewish History and Culture at the University of Leipzig since 2015. He was also director of the Jewish Museum Frankfurt am Main (2006-2015), director of the Leo Baeck Institute, London (2001-2015), and served as director of the Fritz Bauer Institute, Frankfurt am Main (2007-2015). Raphael Gross studied history, philosophy, and literature at the universities of Zurich, Berlin, Bielefeld, and Cambridge (Trinity Hall). Receiving his PhD from the University of Essen in 1997; his PhD thesis, “Carl Schmitt und die Juden”, was published by Suhrkamp in 2000 and in the George L. Mosse Series by the University of Wisconsin Press in 2007, and has been published in translation in the United States, France, and Japan. He is working on a research project on the legal theorist Hans Kelsen and on a critical edition of Anne Frank’s diaries.


Atina Grossmann

Atina Grossmann is Professor of History at the Cooper Union in New York City.Atina Grossmann is Professor of History at the Cooper Union in New York City. Publications include Jews, Germans, and Allies: Close Encounters in Occupied Germany (2007, German 2012, George L. Mosse Prize of the AHA and Fraenkel Prize, Wiener Library); Reforming Sex: The German Movement for Birth Control and Abortion Reform, 1920-1950 (1995) and recent co-edited volumes, Shelter from the Holocaust: Rethinking Jewish Survival in the Soviet Union (2017, with M. Edele and S. Fitzpatrick) and The JDC at 100: A Century of Humanitarianism (2019, with A. Patt, L. Levi, M. Mandel). She is working on Gender and the Holocaust (Bloomsbury) and current research focuses on “Remapping Survival: Jewish Refugees in the Soviet Union, Iran, and India” as well as the entanglements of family memoir and historical scholarship.

 

Rebekka Grossmann

Rebekka Grossmann is a PhD-Candidate in History at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem.Rebekka Grossmann is a PhD candidate in History at the Hebrew University. Her project, Imagining Encounters. Photography, Mobility and the Creation of a Multi-National Space in Mandate Palestine, is funded by the George L. Mosse Program in History as well as the Jack, Joseph & Morton Mandel School for Advanced Studies in the Humanities. In 2017/18 she was a fellow of the Leo Baeck Fellowship Programme. In addition to her PhD she works as a research assistant in a project headed by her supervisor Professor Ofer Ashkenazi on the history of Jewish photography in Germany under Nazi rule, funded by the Israel Science Foundation (ISF).

Anna Hájková

Anna Hájková is associate professor at the University of Warwick.Dr. Anna Hájková is associate professor at the University of Warwick. Her first book, The Last Ghetto: An Everyday History of Theresienstadt, is forthcoming with Oxford University Press. Her article “Sexual Barter in Times of Genocide“ was awarded the Catharine Stimson Prize for Outstanding Feminist Scholarship in 2013. She is working on two projects: a study of transgressive sexuality in the Holocaust, for which is writing a trade book on the Neuengamme guard Anneliese Kohlmann and queer Holocaust history. Her work on queer history of the Holocaust was published in Czech, German, British, and Israeli newspapers. She is co-editing a special issue of German History Sexuality, Holocaust, Stigma. Moreover, she is also working on a generational history of a Communist generation in Central Europe, 1930-1970.


David Harrisville

David Harrisville is Visiting Assistant Professor of Modern European History at Furman University in Greenville, SC.David Harrisville is Visiting Assistant Professor of Modern European History at Furman University in Greenville, SC. He received his B.A. in History from Carleton College and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His teaching and research interests span the history of modern Europe, with special emphasis on Germany, the Second World War, and the history of morality. His current book project examines how soldiers of the Wehrmacht maintained the conviction that they were decent men fighting for a morally worthy cause even as they took part in war crimes during the invasion of the Soviet Union. The self-exonerating letters they wrote home, he argues, laid the foundations for the myth of the “clean” Wehrmacht that would shape German memory for decades to come.

Jeffrey Herf

Jeffrey HerfJeffrey Herf is Distinguished University Professor in the Department of History at the University of Maryland in College Park. In the late 1960s he took courses in modern European history at the University of Wisconsin, Madison with George L. Mosse. He has pursued issues Mosse explored in a number of his published works. His books include: Reactionary Modernism: Technology, Culture and Politics in Weimar and the Third Reich (Cambridge University Press, 1984); Divided Memory: The Nazi Past in the Two Germanys (Harvard University Press, 1997); The Jewish Enemy: Nazi Propaganda During World War II and the Holocaust (Harvard University Press, 2006); and Nazi Propaganda for the Arab World (Yale University Press, 2009); and Undeclared Wars with Israel: East Germany and the West German Far Left, 1967-1989 (Cambridge University Press, 2016). This coming fall, Wallstein Verlag will publish a German translation of Undeclared Wars with Israel. He is currently completing a book on the political and policy debates of 1947-1948 in the United States and Europe about the establishment of the state of Israel.

Meike Hoffmann

Meike Hoffmann organized the first academic training on provenance research at the Free University of Berlin where she received her PhD and now teaches at the department of history and cultural studies on Degenerate Art, and Nazi art policy during the Third Reich.Meike Hoffmann organized the first academic training on provenance research at the Free University of Berlin where she received her PhD and now teaches at the department of history and cultural studies on Degenerate Art, and Nazi art policy during the Third Reich. She was a member of the Taskforce Schwabing Art Trove and participated in the follow-up research project on the Gurlitt collection. Since March 2017, Hoffmann directs the Mosse Art Research Initiative (MARI) at FU Berlin which is the first project in provenance research executed by public German institutions in cooperation with descendants of the victims of Nazi persecution. She has published widely in the field of her expertise and is author of the Gurlitt biography Hitlers Kunsthändler–Hildebrand Gurlitt 1895-1956 (C.H.Beck Munich, 2016).

 

Isabel V. Hull

Isabel V. Hull (Ph.D. Yale 1978) is John Stambaugh Professor of History at Cornell University.Isabel V. Hull (Ph.D. Yale 1978) is John Stambaugh Professor of History at Cornell University. Her research has ranged broadly in German history from the early modern to the modern period, and from governance, the history of sexuality, military culture, and international law. A member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Hull was awarded the Max Weber Stiftung-Historisches Kolleg Prize for lifetime achievement in German history and studies in 2013. She first met George Mosse in 1977 and they became fast friends and colleagues. They served together as co-presidents of the Committee on Lesbian and Gay History, an affiliate organization of the AHA from 1985 to 1987.


Andreas Huyssen

Andreas Huyssen is the Villard Professor emeritus of German and Comparative Literature at Columbia University in New York.Andreas Huyssen is the Villard Professor emeritus of German and Comparative Literature at Columbia University in New York. A founding editor of New German Critique and founding director of Columbia’s Institute for Comparative Literature and Society. His books include After the Great Divide: Modernism, Mass Culture, Postmodernism (1986), Postmoderne: Zeichen eines kulturellen Wandels (ed. with Klaus Scherpe, 1986), Twilight Memories: Marking Time in a Culture of Amnesia (1995), Present Pasts: Urban Palimpsests and the Politics of Memory (2003), the edited volume Other Cities, Other Worlds: Urban Imaginaries in a Globalizing World (2008), William Kentridge and Nalini Malani: The Shadow play as Medium of Memory (2013) and Miniature Metropolis: Literature in an Age of Photography and Film (2015).


Ethan Katz

Ethan Katz is Associate Professor of History and Jewish Studies at the University of California, Berkeley.Ethan Katz was educated at Amherst College (B.A., History & French, 2002) and the University of Wisconsin-Madison (M.A., History, 2005; PhD, History, 2009). He is currently Associate Professor of History and Jewish Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. A specialist of France and the Francophone world, Katz’s research interests include Jewish-Muslim relations, Jews in colonial societies, Holocaust studies, and the interplay between religious and secular in modern Jewish life. His first book, The Burdens of Brotherhood: Jews and Muslims from North Africa to France (Harvard, 2015), received a number of prizes, including the J. Russell Major Prize of the American Historical Association, the David Pinkney Prize of the Society for French Historical Studies, and a National Jewish Book Award. Katz has co-edited three volumes: Secularism in Question: Jews and Judaism in Modern Times (UPenn, 2015), Colonialism and the Jews (Indiana, 2017), and most recently, Jews and Muslims in France Before and After Charlie Hebdo and Hyper Cacher (special issue of Jewish History, 2018). His work has been supported by fellowships, from, among others, the Yad HaNadiv/Beracha Foundation, the Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, and the Vidal Sassoon Institute and Lady Davis Trust of the Hebrew University. He is currently at work on a new book about the Jewish underground in Algiers during World War II currently entitled Freeing the Empire: The Jewish Uprising That Helped the Allies Win the War.


Elissa Mailänder

Elissa Mailänder is an associate professor of contemporary history at Sciences Po, Center for History (CHSP), Paris, France.

Elissa Mailänder is an Associate Professor of contemporary history at Sciences Po, Center for History (CHSP), Paris, France. Aside from her recently published book, Female SS Guards and Workaday Violence: The Majdanek Concentration Camp, 1942–1944 (Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 2015), she has published several articles on perpetrator history and the structures, mechanisms, and dynamics of violence in Nazi concentration and extermination camps. Her new project, however, examines friendship, intimacy and heterosexual relationships in Nazi Germany, highlighting the importance of mass participation and practices of everyday conformity to dictatorship.


Frank Mecklenburg

Frank Mecklenburg is the Director of Research and Chief Archivist of the Leo Baeck Institute, New York.Frank Mecklenburg is the Director of Research and Chief Archivist of the Leo Baeck Institute, New York. He received his Dr. phil. in Modern German History in 1981 from the Technische Universität Berlin. In 2000, he was involved in the LBI’s move to the Center for Jewish History, as well as in the establishment of a joint archives facility with the Jewish Museum Berlin. Since 2007, the holdings of the LBI Archives are being digitized, DigiBaeck is available online open access. For the 80th anniversary of the year 1938, a team of archivists, librarians and IT people created the www.1938Projekt.org a day-by-day calendar with 365 entries from the archival collections of the LBI and contributing institutions.


Regina Mühlhäuser

Regina Mühlhäuser is a senior researcher at the Hamburg Foundation for the Advancement of Research and Culture and an associate researcher at the Hamburg Institute for Social Research. She is one of the coordinators of the “International Research Group ‘Sexual Violence in Armed Conflict'” (SVAC). Regina’s book, Eroberungen. Sexuelle Gewalttaten und intime Beziehungen deutscher Soldaten in der Sowjetunion 1941–1945 (2010), was translated into Japanese (2015) and is forthcoming in English. Her recent work on sexual violence during the Holocaust was published in the Handbook War: Gender (2017). In her current project Cultural Expectations: Sexuality and violence in memories of British WWII soldiers, Regina compares veteran’s narratives on the Asian and the European theatre of war.


Mary Nolan

Mary Nolan is Professor of History emerita at New York University.Mary Nolan is Professor of History emerita at New York University. She works on twentieth-century European-American relations, on German History, and most recently on social and economic human rights in the age of neoliberalism. She is the author of The Transatlantic Century: Europe and America, 1890-2010; Visions of Modernity: American Business and the Modernization of Germany; and Social Democracy and Society: Working-class Radicalism in Düsseldorf, 1890-1920. She coedited Crimes of War: Guilt and Denial in the Twentieth Century; The University against Itself; and The Routledge Handbook of the Global Sixties. She is on the editorial boards of Politics & Society and International Labor and Working-class History.


Anson Rabinbach

Anson Rabinbach is Philip and Beulah Rollins Professor of History at Princeton University and is a founding editor of New German Critique.Anson Rabinbach is Philip and Beulah Rollins Professor of History at Princeton University and is a founding editor of New German Critique. He received his PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1973. He has been a fellow at the American Academy, Berlin (2005) a Fulbright, Senior Scholar at Smolny College, St. Petersburg (2004), a fellow at the Institute for 20th Century History in Jena (2009), and a fellow at the Simon-Dubnow Institut (Leipzig, 2014) at the IFK in Vienna (2013). His research focuses on the cultural and intellectual history of modern Europe. Among his books are: The Crisis of Austrian Socialism: From Red Vienna to Civil War 1927-1934 (The University of Chicago Press, 1981), The Human Motor: Energy, Fatigue, and the Origins of Modernity (Basic Books,1991), In the Shadow of Catastrophe: German Intellectuals Between Apocalypse and Enlightenment (University of California Press, 1996). He has published a documentary history of Nazi Germany, The Third Reich Sourcebook, co-edited with Sander Gilman (The University of California Press. 2013). His most recent book, The Eclipse of the Utopias of Labor (2018) appeared with Fordham University Press. His current research is a conceptual history of the twentieth century, entitled “Concepts that Came in from the Cold: Total War, Totalitarianism, Genocide.”


Mary Louise Roberts

Mary Louise Roberts is the WARF Distinguished Lucie Aubrac and Plaenert-Bascom Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.Mary Louise Roberts is the WARF Distinguished Lucie Aubrac and Plaenert-Bascom Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She is the author, most recently, of D-Day Through French Eyes (2014). What Soldiers Do: Sex and the American GI in World War II (2013), won the American Historical Association’s George Louis Beer Prize and the French Historical Studies’s Gilbert Chinard Prize. The book has appeared in translation in French, Chinese, Japanese and Czech, and forms the basis of a French documentary film “Les Femmes de la libération” produced by Maha Productions, Paris. Roberts has been the recipient of many fellowships, grants and awards, including a a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, a membership at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and grants from the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Social Science Research Council. In the past two years, her work has appeared in Gender and History and Journal of the History of Sexuality.


David Warren Sabean

Sabean, David Warren David Warren Sabean is Henry J. Bruman Endowed Professor of German History, emeritus, and Distinguished Research Professor of European History at the University of California, Los Angeles.David Warren Sabean is Henry J. Bruman Endowed Professor of German History, emeritus, and Distinguished Research Professor of European History at the University of California, Los Angeles. A graduate of the University of Wisconsin, where he studied under George L. Mosse, Sabean has taught at the University of East Anglia, University of Pittsburgh, and Cornell, and he has been a fellow at the Max Planck Institute for history in Göttingen, the Maison des Sciences de l’Homme, the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, the American Academy in Berlin, and the National Humanities Center. He has received a Guggenheim fellowship and a Research Prize from the Alexander Humboldt Foundation. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His publications include: Power in the Blood: Popular Culture and Village Discourse in Early Modern Germany (Cambridge, 1984); Property, Production, and Family in Neckarhausen, 1700-1870 (Cambridge, 1990); and Kinship in Neckarhausen, 1700-1870 (Cambridge, 1998). He is coeditor of Kinship in Europe: Approaches to Long-Term Development (1300-1900) (Berghahn Books, 2007); Sibling Relations and the Transformations of European Kinship 1300-1900 (Berghahn Books, 2011); Transregional and Transnational Families in Europe and Beyond: Experiences Since the Middle Ages (Berghahn Books, 2011); and Blood and Kinship: Matter for Metaphor from Ancient Rome to the Present (Berghahn Books, 2013). During 2016-7, he co-directed an interdisciplinary project on kinship and politics for the Center of Interdisciplinary Research in Bielefeld. Currently he is engaged in an extensive study on the history of incest discourse in Europe and America (1600 to the present).


Peter Schäfer

Peter Schäfer, b. 1943, is currently the Director of the Jewish Museum Berlin. Before this he taught Jewish Studies at the Universities of Tübingen, Cologne, Berlin and Princeton and (as Visiting Professor) at the Universities of Oxford, Jerusalem, Yale, at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America in New York, and at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton.Peter Schäfer, b. 1943, is currently the Director of the Jewish Museum Berlin. Before this he taught Jewish Studies at the Universities of Tübingen, Cologne, Berlin and Princeton and (as Visiting Professor) at the Universities of Oxford, Jerusalem, Yale, at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America in New York, and at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton. He is a recipient of the Leibniz Prize, the Mellon Distinguished Achievement Award, the Howard T. Behrman Award for Distinguished Achievement in the Humanities, the Leopold-Lucas Prize, and the Reuchlin Prize. He holds honorary degrees of the Universities of Utrecht and Tel Aviv, and he is a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy, a Member of the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences, a Foreign Member of the American Philosophical Society, a Fellow of the American Academy for Jewish Research, and a Honorary Foreign Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was a Fellow at the Historisches Kolleg Munich, and at the Wissenschaftskolleg Berlin.


Stefanie Schüler-Springorum

Stefanie Schüler-Springorum is the Director of the Center for Research on Antisemitism, Berlin.Stefanie Schüler-Springorum studied Modern History, Ethnology and Political Science at the Universities of Göttingen/Germany and Barcelona/Spain; PhD University of Bochum/Germany 1993; 1994/95 researcher at the Berlin Foundation “Topography of Terror”; 1996-2001 research projects on German-Jewish History, History of National Socialism, Spanish History, Military History; 2001-2011 Director of the Institute for German-Jewish History and Professor at Hamburg University; since 2009 head of the German branch of the Leo Baeck Institute, since 2011 Director of the Center for Research on Anti-Semitism, Berlin. Author of Geschlecht und Differenz (2014); Krieg und Fliegen. Die Legion Condor im Spanischen Bürgerkrieg 1936-1939 (2010; span. Version 2014); Denkmalsfigur. Biographische Annäherung an Hans Litten (2008); Die jüdische Minderheit in Königsberg/Pr. 1871-1945 (1996).


Moshe Sluhovsky

Moshe Sluhovsky is Paulette and Claude Kelman Professor of French History at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem and the head of the Lafer Center for the Study of Women and Gender and of the Institute of History.Moshe Sluhovsky is Paulette and Claude Kelman Professor of French History at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the head of the Lafer Center for the Study of Women and Gender and of the Institute of History. He got his PhD at Princeton University, then taught at CALTECH and UCLA before moving back to Jerusalem. Over the years he has held a number of fellowships, including a Mellon Foundation and NEH fellowships, and was a fellow at the NHC, Davis Center at Princeton University and Advanced Research Distinguished Fellow at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His latest books are “Believe not Every Spirit”: Demonic Possession, Mysticism, and Discernment in Early Modern Catholicism and Becoming a New Self: Practices of Belief in Early Modern Catholicism. He is currently working on a GIF project on the Jewish presence in Gay Berlin and on the migration of gay and lesbian German Jews to Palestine in the 1930s.


David Sorkin

David Sorkin, Lucy G. Moses Professor of History at Yale, studied with George Mosse as an undergraduate.David Sorkin, Lucy G. Moses Professor of History at Yale, studied with George L. Mosse as an undergraduate. He is the author of The Transformation of German Jewry, 1780-1840 (1987), Moses Mendelssohn and the Religious Enlightenment (1996), The Berlin Haskalah and German Religious Thought (2000), The Religious Enlightenment: Protestants, Jews and Catholics from London to Vienna (2008) and the forthcoming, “When Jews Became Citizens: A History of Emancipation, 1550-2000.”

 

Michael P. Steinberg

Michael P. Steinberg the Barnaby Conrad and Mary Critchfield Keeney Professor of History, and Professor of Music and German Studies at Brown University.Michael P. Steinberg the Barnaby Conrad and Mary Critchfield Keeney Professor of History, and Professor of Music and German Studies at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, USA. From 2016 to 2018 he served as president of the American Academy in Berlin. His books include The Trouble with Wagner (2018) as well as the edited volume Makers of Jewish Modernity (2016; winner of the National Jewish Book Award for non-fiction); Listening to Reason: Culture, Music, and Subjectivity in 19th-Century Music (2004), and The Meaning of the Salzburg Festival (2000), of which the German edition (Ursprung und Ideologie der Salzburger Festspiele; 2000) won Austria’s Victor Adler Staatspreis in 2001. Educated at Princeton University and the University of Chicago, he has been a visiting professor at these two schools as well as at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris and National Tsing-hua University in Taiwan. He was a member of the Cornell University Department of History between 1988 and 2005; a fellow of the American Academy in Berlin in 2003 and at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin in 2015-16. Between 2009 and 2013 he served as dramaturg on a co-production of Wagner’s Ring of the Nibelung for the Berlin State Opera and the Teatro alla Scala, Milan.


Roger Strauch

Roger Strauch is Chairman of The Roda Group, a seed stage venture capital company he co-founded in 1997 with Dan Miller.Roger Strauch is Chairman of The Roda Group, a seed stage venture capital company he co-founded in 1997 with Dan Miller. The firm is focused on investment opportunities that address the consequences of climate change, stress on the Earth’s natural resources and the increased demand for low carbon energy. Roger was Chairman of the Board of Directors of Cool Systems, (recently sold to Avanos Medical Inc., NYSE: AVNS). He was the first CEO of Ask Jeeves (now Ask.com) and served as CEO of public companies, Symmetricom, and TCSI Corp. He recently retired as Chairman of the Board of the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (Berkeley, California). He is a member of the Engineering Dean’s College Advisory Board of the University of California at Berkeley and Roger is an active philanthropist in academia, theatrical arts and chairs a family foundation which supports humanitarian projects. Roger leads the Mosse Art Restitution Project, one of the world’s largest efforts to restitute Nazi expropriated artifacts. Roger received his Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, with distinction, from Cornell University and his Master of Science in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University.


John Tortorice

John TortoriceJohn Tortorice is Director Emeritus of the George L. Mosse Program at UW-Madison/Hebrew University where he worked with students, staff, and faculty from both universities to implement George L. Mosse’s visionary bequest of his estate to benefit future generations of scholars. He has co-authored four books including What History Tells: George L. Mosse and the Culture of Europe (University of Wisconsin Press, 2004).

 


Enzo Traverso

Enzo Traverso is Susan and Barton Winokur Professor in the Humanities at Cornell University.Enzo Traverso is Susan and Barton Winokur Professor in the Humanities at Cornell University. His work deals with modern European intellectual history. He taught political science in France for many years and was visiting professor in several European and Latin American countries. His books, all translated into different languages, include The New Faces of Fascism (Verso, 2019); The Jewish Question: History of a Marxist Debate (Brill, 2018); Left-Wing Melancholia: Marxism, History and Memory (Columbia University Press, 2017); Fire and Blood: The European Civil War 1914-1945 (Verso, 2016); The End of Jewish Modernity (Pluto Press, 2016); The Origins of Nazi Violence (The New Press, 2003); and The Jews and Germany (Nebraska University Press, 1995).

Marc Volovici

Marc Volovici is an Early Career Fellow at the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism at Birkbeck, University of London.Marc Volovici is an Early Career Fellow at the Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism at Birkbeck, University of London. He completed his PhD at Princeton University’s Department of History (2017), and is currently completing a book manuscript, titled German as a Jewish Problem: The Language Politics of Jewish Nationalism. He is the co-editor of the exhibition catalogue Jews, Money, Myth (Jewish Museum London, 2019). Among his published articles are: “Leon Pinsker’s Autoemancipation! and the Emergence of German as a Language of Jewish Nationalism” (Central European History, 2017), and “The Contamination of Language: George Steiner and the Postwar Fate of German and Jewish Cultures” (Sprache, Erkenntnis, und Bedeutung: Deutsch in der jüdischen Wissenskultur, eds. Arndt Engelhardt and Susanne Zepp, 2015). His new project deals with the question of self-censorship in modern Jewish history.

Elisabeth Wagner

Elisabeth WagnerElisabeth Wagner is an art historian, lecturer, and the managing director of the Mosse-Lectures at Humboldt University; early in her career she investigated the art related activities in companies like Siemens, Daimler and Bayer (Kunstszenarien in Unternehmen, 1999) and curated exhibitions in various places (Peter Weiss, 1991, Ergin Inan, 2006, Peter Dittmar, 2009, Ben Willikens 2006), she wrote extensively on modern German literature, and artists like Anselm Kiefer, Guillermo Kuitca, William Kentridge, and James Turell; she is the managing director of the Berlin Mosse-Lectures, editor and contributor of numerous publications related to the Mosse project: Staatsbürgerschaft / Citizenship, 2013, Europa in anderen Kulturen, 2015, Konversionen, 2017, Mosse Almanach, 2017, Non-Finito. Fluchtlinien des Kreativen in Kunst und Literatur, 2019, presently she is working on a book about the Mosse women.

Sarah Wobick-Segev

Sarah Wobick-Segev is a Minerva Postdoctoral Fellow at the Richard Koebner Minerva Center for German History at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem.Sarah Wobick-Segev is a Minerva Postdoctoral Fellow at the Richard Koebner Minerva Center for German History at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She is the author of Homes away from Home: Jewish Belonging in Twentieth-Century Paris, Berlin, and St. Petersburg (Stanford University Press, 2018) and, together with Dr. Gideon Reuveni, co-editor of The Economy in Jewish History: New Perspectives on the Interrelationship between Ethnicity and Economic Life (Berghahn Books, 2011). She has recently published articles in Jewish Social Studies and German History. Presently, she is working on her second monograph, an investigation of several prominent Central European Jewish women who, through their work and writings, served as public producers of Judaism and Jewish religious culture.


Sunny Yudkoff

Sunny Yudkoff is assistant professor in the Center for Jewish Studies and the Department of German, Nordic, and Slavic at the University of Wisconsin—Madison.Sunny Yudkoff is assistant professor in the Center for Jewish Studies and the Department of German, Nordic, and Slavic at the University of Wisconsin—Madison. She is the Interim Associate Director of the George L. Mosse Program in History. Her first book, Tubercular Capital: Illness and the Conditions of Modern Jewish Writing (Stanford University Press), appeared in December, 2018. She is currently at work on her second book entitled, The Body Poetic: Yankev Glatshteyn’s Physiological Aesthetics. Her work has appeared in Prooftexts, Studies in American Jewish Literature, and Literature and Medicine. She is also the Peer Review Editor of In geveb: A Journal of Yiddish Studies.

Robert Zwarg

Robert Zwarg is a research associate at the German Literature Archive Marbach in the project 1968: Conflicting Ideas in Global Archives.Robert Zwarg studied translation, cultural studies and philosophy in Leipzig, Mexico City and Davis. He wrote his PhD on the reception of the Frankfurt School in the United States of America, focusing especially on the journals Telos and New German Critique (published as „Die Kritische Theorie in Amerika. Das Nachleben einer Tradition“, 2017). He is currently a research associate at the German Literature Archive Marbach in the project 1968: Conflicting Ideas in Global Archives. His current research focuses on the notion of the everyday.