University of Wisconsin–Madison

Fellowships

Meet our current Program Fellows

Adi Armon (2017-2018)
Adi Armon (2017-2018)

In 2013 Adi Armon received his PhD from the Department of Political Science at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His research combines cultural and intellectual history, political theory, and Jewish Studies, and his primary areas of research are: (1) Intellectuals in the twentieth century and the development of their thought, focusing on Jewish thinkers who emigrated from Germany to America and had to confront questions regarding modernity, morality, technology, theology, law and politics after the Holocaust. (2) Modern European history, examining some of the multiple meeting points between European culture and the modern Jewish experience. (3) Philosophies of Judaism: Modern Jewish thought from Spinoza to Leo Strauss. (4) The development of Zionist thought from the nineteenth century to the establishment of the State of Israel.

Preston Lee Atwood, Exchange Fellow (2017-2019)
Preston Lee Atwood, Exchange Fellow (2017-2019)

Preston Lee Atwood is a Ph.D. candidate (Hebrew Bible & Semitic Studies) in the Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he also completed his M.A. in Hebrew Bible & Semitic Studies in 2016. He holds a Th.M. in Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and a M.Div. from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. He received his B.A. in Humanities from the College at Southwestern. He is the 2017-2019 George L. Mosse Exchange Program Fellow. His dissertation examines the relationship between the Syriac Peshitta and other ancient translations of the Hebrew Bible (e.g., Septuagint, Targum) and employs recent developments in translation studies and text-critical theory.

 

 

Tobias Bitterli, Exchange Fellow (2017-2018)
Tobias Bitterli, Exchange Fellow (2017-2018)

Tobias Bitterli is a PhD candidate at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem where he also completed his B.A and M.A studies in history. He is the 2017-2018 George L. Mosse Fellow to the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In his dissertation, he examines how aristocratic and bourgeois collectors of cabinets of curiosities in the 16th and 17th century used their collections to produce, disseminate, and organize knowledge. During his stay at the University of Wisconsin-Madison he hopes to deepen his knowledge of history of science and is looking forward to using the various special collections the library at UW has to offer, especially the collection about the history of science and the history of the book.

Michal Friedman, HUJI MA student (2017-2019)
Michal Friedman, HUJI MA student (2017-2019)

Michal Friedman is currently finishing her B.A at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, studying history in an honors program and focusing on modern Korea. Her main fields of interest are gender history, history of marginalized groups, cultural history and the history of food. During the course of her B.A. studies she was placed on the Dean’s list and was a recipient of the Dean’s and the Rector’s awards.

 

 

 

 

Hikaru Kumon, Exchange Fellow (2017-2019)
Hikaru Kumon, Exchange Fellow (2017-2019)

Hikaru Kumon is a PhD candidate at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies. He is the 2017-2018 George L. Mosse Fellow to the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is interested in Semitic Linguistics, and plans to write his dissertation on abstract nouns in the Hebrew Bible.

 

 

 

 

 

Ofer Pogorelsky, PhD Candidate at HUJI
Ofer Pogorelsky, PhD Candidate at HUJI

Following a B.A. in Philosophy, Political Science and Economics (PPE program) at the Hebrew University, I engaged in the study of History, focusing on the Near East in late antiquity. My M.A. research is dedicated to the Negev region in the 6th and 7th centuries CE, drawing primary on papyri from Nessana. In my PhD research I plan to examine the Byzantine-Muslim transition in Palestine and Arabia.

Fellowships

  • Graduate Fellowship in Modern Jewish History

    This fellowship is intended to attract and support outstanding Ph.D. candidates who wish to study some aspect of Modern Jewish history in any area of the world. The fellowship package, available only to incoming students, consists of five years of guaranteed support. Also included in the package is $4,000 in summer support annually for five years.

    To apply: Submit an application to the UW-Madison Department of History, specifying your wish to be considered for the Mosse Fellowship in Jewish History on the Supplemental Information for Fellowships and Teaching Assistantships form found on the History Department’s Graduate Admission webpage.

    For more information, visit the

    UW-Madison History Department fellowships page.

    Students can also take advantage of the thirty-five faculty from seventeen disciplines associated with the George L. Mosse/Laurence A. Weinstein Center for Jewish Studies, an interdisciplinary program.

    Admission to the Department of History at UW-Madison and the Mosse Fellowships can be found at:

    UW-Madison History Department

    or contact Leslie Abadie, abadie@wisc.edu, (608) 263-1962

     

    For additional information on the Mosse Fellowships

    Tony Michels, George L. Mosse Professor of American Jewish History and Jewish Studies, aemichels@wisc.edu.

    Amos Bitzan, Frances and Laurence Weinstein Assistant Professor of History, abitzan@wisc.edu.

    Skye Doney, Director Mosse Program, doney@wisc.edu.

    Application Deadline is December 1

  • Teaching Fellowships in European History

    George L. Mosse Teaching Fellowships in European History

    Former students of George Mosse who wish to honor their teacher in a way that acknowledged his commitment to teaching, and his extraordinary ability to inspire his students established the George L. Mosse Teaching Fellowship in 1992. Contributions to the teaching fellowship fund by former students, other alumni, colleagues, and friends underwrite one teaching fellowship per semester. The Teaching Fellowship allows an advanced PhD student under the supervision of the doctoral advisor to develop and teach an undergraduate course, and to gain valuable teaching skills. The Mosse Teaching Fellow is considered a part of the Department of History faculty and has full responsibility for teaching an undergraduate class. The fellowship recipient creates the syllabus, selects the textbooks, has an office, maintains office hours, and is listed as the instructor of the course in the timetable. The fellowship comes at an important juncture, as the final year is often the most difficult for a doctoral student to finance. Funding assists the student to complete his or her dissertation in European history, and gain important teaching experience. The Graduate Fellowship Committee of the Department of History chooses Mosse Fellows, with consideration given to the applicant’s academic record and prior performance as a teaching assistant.

    Outstanding graduate students can be inspiring teachers as they are still in the process of learning and sharing knowledge. Being younger in age, their enthusiasm is especially valued by the undergraduate students.

    Teaching Fellowships in European History 1996-2016

    1995-1996
    Susan Dinan, Ph.D.
    Course Title: Women in Europe 1500-1830

    1997-1998
    Susan Boettcher, Ph.D.
    Course Title: The City & Urban Life in Early Modern Europe

    1999-2000
    Daniel Kowalsky, Ph.D.
    Course Title: Revolution and Civil War in Twentieth-Century Europe

    2001-2002
    Erik Jensen, Ph.D.
    Course Title: Weimar Germany: Society, Politics and Modernity in Europe’s ‘Roaring Twenties’

    2001-2002
    Alison Schulz, Ph.D.
    Course Title: Revolutionary Britain: Civil War and Commonwealth

    2002-2003
    Eric Carlsson, Ph.D.
    Course Title: Religion and the European Enlightenment, 1650-1800

    2002-2003
    Robert Zens, Ph.D.
    Course Title: From Empire to Nation-State: History of the Balkans

    2003-2004
    Eric Ehrenreich, Ph.D.
    Course Title: History of European Racism

    2003-2004
    Catherine Plum, Ph.D.
    Course Title: East German Society & Culture, 1949-1989

    2004-2005
    Eric Zuelow, Ph.D.
    Course Title: The History of Modern Travel

    2004-2005
    Scott Moranda, Ph.D.
    Course Title: Society and Environment: An Environmental History of the European World

    2004-2005
    Ana Schaposchnik, Ph.D.
    Course Title: Society and Environment: An Environmental History of the European World

    2004-2005
    Gil Ribak, Ph.D.
    Course Title: Jewish – Gentile Relations in Urban America, 1830-1970

    2005-2006
    Denise Kawasaki, Ph.D.
    Course Title: Medieval Thought from St. Augustine to Fifteenth Century Conciliarism

    2005-2006
    Robert Lewis, Ph.D.
    Course Title: The European City and the Transformation of Visual Culture, 1850-Present

    2006-2007
    Sharon Elise (Lisa) Cline, Ph.D.
    Course Title: Nationalism and Sexuality in 19th and 20th Century Europe

    2007-2008
    William Meier, Ph.D.
    Course Title: The European Underworld, 1800-2000: A Social and Cultural History

    2007-2008
    Hunter Martin, Ph.D.
    Course Title: French Intellectuals in the 20th Century: Ideology and Identity

    2008-2009
    Holly Grout, Ph.D.
    Course Title: European Consumer Society, 1700-Present

    2008-2009
    Eric Platt, Ph.D.
    Course Title: The Netherlands in the Age of Rembrandt and Vermeer

    2008-2009
    Ethan Katz, Ph.D.
    Course Title: 2008-2009 – Teaching Fellowship – Ethan Katz

    2008-2009
    Gregory Shealy, Ph.D.
    Course Title: Germany in the Long 19th Century

    2010-2011
    Jeffrey Hobbs Ph.D.
    Course Title: The History of Democracy in Europe, 1789-2000

    2010-2011
    James Matenaer, Ph.D.
    Course Title: The Developing Institutions of Medieval Education, 300-1500

    2011-2012
    James Coons, Ph.D.
    Course Title: Rebels, Revolutionaries, and Cultural Change in Europe, 1300-1800

    2011-2012
    Jessica Kirstein, Ph.D.
    Course Title: Modern Jewish History in Latin America

    2012-2013
    Eric O’Connor, Ph.D.
    Course Title: The Historical Development of European Unity, 1945-Present

    2013-2014
    Katie Jarvis, Ph.D.
    Course Title: From Humors to Hysteria: Human and Political Bodies in European History, 1517-1918

    2013-2014
    Terry Peterson, Ph.D.
    Course Title: Europeans and Muslims in the Modern Mediterranean, 1800-Present

    2014-2015
    Lane Sunwall, ABD
    Course Title: European Imperialism: Expansion and Contraction? — 1870-Present

    2015-2016
    Grace Allen, Ph.D.
    Course Title: From Food to Fashion: Creating Consumer Desire in Modern Europe

    2017-2018
    John Boonstra
    Course Title: TBA

    2017-2018
    Abby Lewis
    Course Title: TBA

  • Graduate Fellowship in LGBT History

    This fellowship is intended to attract and support outstanding Ph.D. candidates who wish to study some aspect of LGBT history in any area of the world. The fellowship package, available only to incoming students, consists of five years of guaranteed support. Also included in the package is $4,000 in summer support annually for five years.

    To apply: Submit an application to the UW-Madison Department of History, specifying your wish to be considered for the Mosse Fellowship in LGBT History on the Supplemental Information for Fellowships and Teaching Assistantships form found on the History Department’s Graduate Admission webpage.

    For more information, visit the UW-Madison History Department fellowships page.

    Application Information

    Candidates for the Mosse LGBT Fellowship: submit an application to the UW-Madison Dept. of History, specifying you wish to be considered for the Mosse Fellowship in LGBT History on the Supplemental Information for Fellowships and Teaching Assistantships form.

    For more application information

    For additional information on the Mosse LGBT Fellowship contact Profs

    Application Deadline is December 1

  • Undergraduate Research and Service Prize

    Mosse Distinguished Research and Service Fellowship

    Stick People Productions

    Thanks to the financial support of the Mosse Program, the Department of History is pleased to offer the Mosse Distinguished Research and Service Fellowship.

    The Mosse Fellowship ($2,000) is designed to reward majors who have demonstrated excellence in historical research and have undertaken significant community service at the campus, local, national or international level. The award funds students who need financial support to undertake significant community service oriented learning.

  • Undergraduate Peer Advisors

    Peer Advisor Testimonials:

    George Mosse with Students in Madison

    George Mosse with students, 1982 – superimposed with Peer Advisors, 2015

    My job is fun, but I also think it’s important. The kind of help and advice Henry (the other peer advisor) and I give students makes a real difference in their experiences as history majors at the UW. In working with such a large and interesting pool of History majors, I’ve learned a lot about how to tailor my communication efforts to people’s specific needs. I’ve also learned a lot about how to get involved on campus, and how to encourage other students to plug in to all of the resources Madison has to offer.

    – Zach Edin

    Students come to my office with a variety of concerns, questions and aspirations and we work together to develop a plan to assure the best possible experience for them in the History program. This includes study abroad planning, enrollment questions, and my favorite, course planning. While most student have relatively straight forward needs, creating an effective plan for more complex circumstances is one of the most challenging and rewarding aspects of my work with students.

    – Megan Ness, 2015

    Every day, I see and experience the value of the Mosse Undergraduate Peer Advisor program. Whether I’m making course schedules with students, crunching numbers to ensure someone can graduate on time, recommending classes or discussing what someone can do with a History major, my belief that this program makes a difference is confirmed constantly by students’ praise, feedback and increased use of the advising resources offered by the History department.

    – Catherine Diao, 2012

  • Faculty Exchange Information (UW-Madison - Hebrew University)
    George L. Mosse Faculty Exchange Professor Sean Dinces teaches at the Hebrew University in November, 2015. 
    George L. Mosse Faculty Exchange Professor Sean Dinces teaches at the Hebrew University in November, 2015.

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

     

    George L. Mosse, a great historian, teacher, mentor, and friend, graced the UW-Madison campus for some forty years, and the Hebrew University for some twenty years creating a vital and variegated international intellectual community. He has provided the Departments of History at both institutions with a generous bequest that aims to make it possible for junior faculty and postdoctoral fellows to experience that community.

    The Faculty Exchange Program is intended to enable participants to spend an academic year at Hebrew University in order to advance their careers and broaden their intellectual horizons. The exchange provides the time and resources to allow junior scholars to engage in intensive research and writing with limited teaching obligations.

    The Exchange Program will cover the full costs of an academic year at Hebrew University, including

    • Salary/benefits
    • Travel (includes spouse, children)

    Priority is given to faculty in the Department of History and faculty affiliated with the Mosse/Weinstein Center for Jewish Studies, but all faculty members in the Humanities and Social Sciences are eligible.

    Responsibilities

    • Exchange faculty teach one undergraduate seminar per semester and are available to students and faculty for consultation. Participants may be asked to teach both undergraduate and graduate students.

    Applications should consist of

    • 2 to 3 page letter outlining current research
    • Description of the seminar that will be taught
    • Letter from departmental chair endorsing participation
    • CV

    Applications should be submitted to

    • The Mosse Faculty Exchange Program
      Department of History
      5231 Mosse Humanities
      455 N. Park St.
      Madison, WI 53706

    THE DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS February 1st
    FELLOWSHIPS WILL BE ANNOUNCED BY February 15th

    For more information, please contact

    • Skye Doney
      Mosse Program
      608-263-1835
      Fax: 608/263-5302

    For additional information, visit on the Mosse Program at the Hebrew University, the Hebrew University, and the Rothberg International School.

  • Faculty Exchange Summaries (UW-Madison - Hebrew University)

    Faculty Exchange Experiences:

    Faculty and Post-Doctoral Exchange Participants
    The Hebrew University-Jerusalem

    • Steven Aschheim, “European Cultural History since 1870”
    • Gabriel Herman, “Morality and Behavior in Democratic Athens”
    • Edward Breuer, “Jews and Modernity”
    • Gideon Reuveni, (Post-Doctoral Fellow) “Society and Culture in Weimar Germany”
    • Yotam Hotam, (Post-Doctoral Fellow) “The Age of Youth: Youth Culture and Organizations in Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Century Europe”
    • Diego Olstein, “Medieval Iberia: Conflicts and Encounters”. Fellowship Report.
    • Anat Stern, (Post-Doctoral Fellow)
    • Adi Armon, “Jewish Intellectuals and Politics in the Twentieth Century”

    Faculty Exchange Participants
    UW-Madison

    • Anatoly Khazanov, “Ethnicity in the Soviet Union”
    • Rachel Brenner, “Representations of Women in Modern Jewish Literature”
    • Michael Chamberlain, “Family and Gender in Medieval Islam”
    • Andre Wink, “The Indo-Islamic World”
    • Ken Goldstein, “Political Communication in the United States”
    • Chad Goldberg, “Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy in America since 1890”
    • Neil Kodesh, “Health, Disease, and Healing in Africa”
    • John Michael Fox, “Wisdom Literature” and “History of Pentateuchal Research”
    • Sean Dinces, “Capital Cities: Urban Growth in Global and Historical Perspective”